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What is mindfulness meditation

One of the benefits that meditation brings to our daily lives is that it protects certain areas of the brain, delaying to a greater or lesser extent its aging. And precisely one of these areas especially protected thanks to Mindfundless meditation is the one dedicated to attention, so that Mindfundless allows us to pay attention to what happens around us and decide how we will react, instead of letting ourselves be carried away by the automatic or mechanical reactions by which we are guided in other cases.
Thus, Mindfundless learning is based on enhancing the ability to be attentive when one wants to be attentive, something that has a lot of applications in our daily lives. In fact, the strongest advocates of this philosophy claim that we can transform our daily life into a meditation itself. At the same time, this reinforcement of the part of the brain dedicated to attention helps us to age in a much healthier way, something that will undoubtedly also have more than positive consequences on our general well-being.

Mindfulness practice

In 1960, Nhat Hanh went to the United States to study comparative religions at Princeton University and was later appointed professor of Buddhism at Columbia University. He communicated in French, Chinese, Sanskrit, Pali, Japanese and English, in addition to his native Vietnamese. In 1963, he returned to Vietnam to assist his followers in their nonviolent actions for peace.
Despite the controversy, Nhat Hanh returned to Vietnam again in 2007, while two senior officials of the banned Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam (UBCV) remained under house arrest. The Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam considered Nhat Hanh’s visit a betrayal, symbolizing Nhat Hanh’s desire to work with the oppressors of his co-religionists. Vo Van Ai, a spokesman for the UBCV said, «I believe that Thich Nhat Hanh’s trip is manipulated by the Hanoi government to hide its repression of the Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam and create a false impression of religious freedom in Vietnam.» [27] The Plum Village website states that the three objectives of his return trip to Vietnam were to support the monastics of his order, to organize and conduct «Great Chanting Ceremonies» ceremonies for the purpose of helping to heal wounds from the Vietnam War, and to lead retreats for monastics and lay people. The chanting ceremonies were originally called «Grand Requiem for Praying Equally for All to Untie the Knots of Unjust Suffering,» but Vietnamese officials protested, claiming that it was unacceptable for the government to «equalize» prayers for South Vietnamese army soldiers or American soldiers. Nhat Hanh agreed to change the name into «Grand Requiem For Praying.»[27] The name was changed to «Grand Requiem For Praying.»[27

Mindfulness mindfulness

The concept of mindfulness, originating in Buddhism, is neither religious nor esoteric in nature: it is described as dispassionate, non-evaluative, and sustained moment-to-moment attention to perceivable mental states and processes, including physical sensations, perceptions, affective states, thoughts, and imagination. It is intended to be dispassionate and non-evaluative: it involves paying sustained attention to mental content but not thinking about it, comparing it, or evaluating it in any way.[4][8] The program is intended to be a less invasive and less invasive method.
The program is intended to be a less invasive method of achieving improvement in patients with chronic pain conditions, reduction in stress,[4] help with eating disorders[9] and depression[10] and increased sense of well-being[citation needed] and claims to achieve everything from an increase in the ability of the body’s immune system to protect against disease[citation needed] to a shift in the use of the right prefrontal cerebral cortex, associated with anxiety, depression and rejection, to the left prefrontal cortex, associated with well-being[citation needed].

Mindfulness definition in english

Mindfulness, also called mindfulness, consists of being consciously and intentionally attentive to what we do in the present moment, without judging, attaching to, or rejecting the experience in any way.[1] Mindfulness, also called mindfulness or mindful awareness, consists of being consciously and intentionally attentive to what we do in the present moment, without judging, attaching to, or rejecting the experience in any way.
Nearly a century later, in the 1970s Jon Kabat-Zinn chose it to name meditation in his program, in order to bridge the reticence that existed at the time toward Eastern mysticism, giving it its current meaning: «awareness arising from mindfulness, with purpose focused on the present moment, and without judgment.»[2]
While there is evidence that mindfulness therapy has greater effectiveness than mere exposure to psychoeducation, relaxation, imagination, its efficacy is similar to cognitive-behavioral therapy.[5] The effectiveness of mindfulness therapy is similar to that of cognitive-behavioral therapy.[5] The effectiveness of mindfulness therapy is similar to that of cognitive-behavioral therapy.
Since its inception, MBSR has been applied both to healthy people under stress, as well as to patients with various diseases: rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, cancer, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia, etc. [citation needed]